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Under all that incredibly fresh ikura is fabulously soft uni (sea urchin) egg custard. Known to be a signature of Chef Kazu, this dish also has kuruma (Japanese tiger prawn), some light jelly and freshly grated wasabi (hopefully, I didn't miss anything out - eating it was keeping me rather preoccupied 😂).
I found the taste very appealing as it's light yet bright with the flavours of the sea. Frankly, I'd be happy to pay for a double portion 😋
We had this as part of our omakase dinner at Kakure which is priced at $88++ and $138++, depending on whether you choose to end your meal with the Wagyu Beef Curry Rice or Chirashi.
Very importantly, if you love sake, I highly recommend having the sake pairing ($118++). Hiroshi-san, the Japanese sommelier will select 6 kinds of sake to best go with the six courses of your omakase meal. Feel free to ask him questions about the sake he's chosen as he's very knowledgeable and pretty eloquent in English.

If you've always thought of @fatcowsg as a Japanese Wagyu restaurant, it's time for a rethink. The newly-renovated section now boasts an omakase counter that seats 8 and a spectacular, spoil-you-silly menu to match.
Friendly Head Chef Shigeru Kasajima rules the roost and is the creator behind the omakase lunch ($120++) and dinner ($280++) sets.
What he serves is Japanese dishes with subtle twists, a few of which reflect techniques drawn from his past experience in the kitchen of a French fine dining restaurant.
Over the course of an evening, he prepared and presented us with the following sumptuous gems:
- A platter of three kinds of appetisers
- Refreshing chilled Japanese fruit tomato, soft jelly, tai sashimi and bafun uni
- A bowl of hot, soul-satisfying tai fish head soup
- Crab in shell with kani miso, yuzu foam plus a lovely housemade fruit vinegar dip
- Immensely tender Japanese abalone steamed in sake for 3 hours and given a kiss of truffle salt
- Sashimi of kai with grated-on-the-spot Himalayan pink salt
- Sashimi of whelk and geoduck
- Lightly grilled Grade 4 Ohmi Wagyu ribeye served with Chef's "secret recipe" ponzu sauce and a creamy goma dare
- A jaw-droppingly huge raw botan ebi served in a glass of ponzu and truffle oil
- Astonishingly good flounder sushi with soya sauce foam and oba leaf pesto
- Aburi otoro sushi
- Grilled foie gras sushi
- Uni sushi
- Baby leeks, sour plum paste and bonito flakes sushi
- Nikiri shoyu marinated akami sushi
- Chef's super-decadent signature sushi that heaved with Saga Wagyu beef tartare, uni, amaebi and ikura
- Hotate with yuzu foam and lime zest
- Anago sushi
- Tamago branded with "FC"
- Miso soup
- Japanese pear
I was fascinated to see that instead of pickled ginger, Chef made pickled chrysanthemum petals. Delicately succulent, they harbour a tinge of sweetness which was a nice change from the usual. He also chose to present his pieces of sushi on just a bamboo leaf alone.
I can imagine a few of you purists shuddering as you read my post but I say, be open to explore. You'll never know what new tastes and food experiences await. And in the process of discovery lies the fun.

During weekdays, Chef Koji does a very good value $88++ sushi course for lunch.
He starts you off with a mixed green salad before proceeding to carefully craft and place one sublime piece of sushi at a time in front of you, keeping the pace nice and leisurely. The total number of sushi is ten and they are all fantastically fresh as he uses seasonal seafood. Here is what we we had:
- Shima Aji (mackerel)
- Shiro Ika (yuzu zest-speckled squid)
- Shima Saba (marinated mackerel)
- Chutoro (medium fatty tuna)
- Hotate (scallop)
- Amaebi (sweet shrimp)
- Akame Zuke (marinated tuna)
- Kinmedai (roasted with salt)
- Negitoro Maki Roll (3 pieces)
- Anago (sea eel)
Besides the raw items, you also get a piece of grilled fish (it was a hefty chunk of Teriyaki Buri that day), mini rice bowl with Uni and Ikura, a small chawanmushi, miso soup and dessert.
I can't wait to return for another lunch soon. Thanks Burpple Tastemaker @blueskiescottonclouds for organising this gathering to introduce us to this gem.

This is "next level" grass-fed beef.
Not only was it aged at the source but it has also undergone an intense process of repetitive roast-and-rest at the restaurant to get it to such swoon-worthy flavour.
I have always felt grass-fed beef tastes best when it has a little extra something and Head Chef Luke Armstrong tackles that here with Japanese abalone mushrooms. The heady, earthy aroma of these fungi was brilliantly exploited in the sauce which was poured over the beef upon serving.
This was part of the "Lunch Tasting Menu" which was basically done "Omakase" style. It was fun to sit back and wait to be surprised one course at a time.

Having really enjoyed Chef Ivan Brehm's "crossroads cuisine" at @restaurantnouri, I was naturally excited for his first "Four Hands" event with Chef Leandro Carreira. From Chef Ivan's instagram posts and spotting them at work in the open kitchen area upon my arrival, I knew my group of friends and I were in for a wonderful meal. Their camaraderie was certainly palpable.
Every course with the exception of the last (Nouri's signature nutmeg candy in a mind-boggling puzzle box) was a result of the collaboration. Flavours and textures constantly surprised throughout the meal as ingredients took on innovative forms and were presented in new ways. The first jaw-dropping moment was with one of the three snacks, the Clams Bulhão Pato. Imagine the very essence of a clam in its thinnest and crispiest guise - brilliant.
For me, the other standouts from the meal were the Japanese Sardine in Escabeche - its intrinsic fishiness nicely tempered by light curing and Nyonya pickles, and the King Crab with Toasted Milk Tofu - I loved the way the spicy heat of the peppercorns and soft creaminess of tofu tasted with the sweet, smoky chunks of crabmeat.
I found the desserts of Peanut Soup, Halva with Mandarin Sorbet as well as the Requeijao with Lemon Curd, Malt and Vanilla Cracker memorable for different reasons. The former framed peanuts (which I am not crazy about honestly) in a whole new and refreshing light - one that I thoroughly enjoyed with surprise written all over my face. On the other hand, the latter felt familiar (like a deconstructed lemon cheesecake) but executed to absolute perfection.
Contributing to the terrific evening was the warm service from team Nouri. The thoughtfully concocted cocktails by bartender Joe Fong and restaurant manager Matthew got the merriment rolling and it didn't stop thanks to the premium sake that our friend Louis so generously shared.

I learned of this restaurant from Burpplers @blueskiescottonclouds and @acamasteo. It's supposedly one of the best, if not the best place for a la carte tempura in Singapore right now. Opened in May this year, it has a discreet, traditional-looking entrance that seems rather unusual in Ngee Ann Shopping Centre which is where it is located. Once you're through the door, you'll need to walk down slightly maze-like corridors to finally be seated either in the tempura room or the sushi room.
The tempura here is very refine in every sense of the word. Not only does each ingredient come clad in an ultra thin layer of crunchy, grease-free coating of batter, they are cooked one at a time and served to you the moment it is removed from the fryer. You can choose how to savour each item, either by dipping in a bowl of light sauce into which finely grated radish should go, or with salt and pepper. A wedge of lemon and chilli spice powder are the other condiments available to you too.
I decided on the $80++ tempura omakase and was very satisfied with the overall quality and taste. After a cold appetiser of sea eel, and a mixed seasonal vegetable with fish roe, the chef proceeded to cook my tempura. Timing was pretty good with each new piece arriving just after I'd finished or was about to finish the preceding one. The freshness of the ingredients was impressive. Coupled with the delicate batter, it's not rocket science to conclude that every bite was pure bliss. Dessert was ice-cream, and I found both the brown tea and sweet potato flavours delightful.

Here's the Botan Ebi's encore appearance in our 10-course Omakase meal - its head in deepfried form.
Prior to this, the whole prawn was served sashimi-style with thick slices of Otoro, Chutoro and Kanpachi, as the fourth dish of the night.

I feel the Omakase we had was worth the $100++ as Chef Fabio served plenty of premium quality ingredients throughout our meal. Here's what we had:
1) Oyster shooter - It was the huge and creamy variety and the dressing was a good blend of savoury and spicy with a hint of sour.
2) Raw squid and okra with mentaiko - Chewy and slimy with an umami kick.
3) Cold poached egg with wasabi-marinated octopus and ikura - A really sensuous creation.
4) Sashimi - The botan ebi shrimp and thick cuts of otoro, chutoro and kanpachi were superbly fresh. When we were done, the shrimp head was taken away, deepfried and served again, all hot and crispy this time. Total scrumptiousness.
5) Two kinds of tempura with mentaiko mayo - I love, love, love the natto and seaweed because I am a natto fan. The Tai fish with Shiso leaf was also delicious.
6) Crab and foie gras - The former, which was really fresh, had been cooked in a light sauce, while the latter was pan-fried. The chunk of braised daikon below proved a nice foil to the richness of this dish.
7) Mangalica pork with burdock root crisps, edamame and potato salad - I chose to replace the original item of lamb with this because I am more of a pork person.
No regrets.
8) Sanbo Rice - Not pictured as I did a standalone post about it. It's just too good!
9) Somen with chives - The soft noodles look plain but every strand was full of flavour from being cooked in a tasty stock.
10) Japanese musk melon - One half was original but the other had been soaked in whisky (thanks to @jiaknonstop's instructions to the chef). Both were divine.
Conclusion: The ambience of this rather spacious restaurant isn't anything to shout about but the quality and variety of the food at those prices makes it worth traveling (if you live anywhere else besides the East) all the way to Chai Chee for.

This was the second last course before dessert in our Omakase dinner. It's basically a premium version of a do-it-yourself handroll.
We were each presented with a bowl that contained very fresh minced fatty tuna, uni, ikura and seasoned rice. On the side, neatly fanned out, were a few sheets of crispy roasted seaweed. The correct way to enjoy this was to first give everything in the bowl a good stir, then scoop a bit of the mixture onto a piece of the seaweed, roll it to form a cigar shape of sorts and start munching.
I must say, this was an absolute winner. So fresh and tasty, especially with the pops of flavour and texture from tiny bits of crunchy tempura batter and toasted sesame seeds buried within the mixture.

Here's the second item to be served at our omakase dinner. The delicate slices of fresh sea bream were dressed with truffle oil, caviar and Chef's specially-made bonito flakes. It was as much a pleasure on the tastebuds as it was a treat for the eyes.

My first dinner here saw me selecting the $98++ omakase (also available in $68++ and $138++).
After I had polished off an appetiser of thinly-sliced sea bream topped with caviar (pictured above in the corner top left) and a plate of sashimi, the following seven pieces of sushi were meticulously put together and served one at a time by Leading Chef Kenny:

1. Kanpachi
2. Engawa (Flounder Fin)
3. Marinated Bluefin Tuna with Japanese Yam
4. Kohada and Wakame
5. Aburi Salmon with Chef's Special Bonito Flakes
6. Foie Gras on Hotate (Scallop)
7. Anago (Sea Eel)

I found the quality of every sushi to be impressive, both in freshness and in size.
Chef then made me a bowl of Fresh Clams in Miso Soup on the spot. Its belly-warming comfort was a really wonderful thing to sip on. My meal was brought to a close with Ume Jelly for dessert.

Trust Burpple's product engineer @sidhartha91 to spot a new F&B establishment within the first day of its opening. Once I heard about it from him, I made sure I paid "Southpaw Bar & Sushi" a visit pronto.
A dinner-only place, the $98++ omakase dinner was my choice. For the first course, it was a gigantic oyster of the Canadian Rock variety. When offered by the owner Roy, I couldn't resist the unique 2-step whisky pairing of it with "The Ten #3 Light Highland".
This is how it went: I first took a sip from my glass of the Clyneish distilled whisky - it was selected by Roy (who's got more than a decade's experience in whisky and cigars) for its flowery, briny notes to complement the shellfish. The pale golden liquid (it has no extra colouring added) got my palate warmed up to better enjoy the lusciously creamy oyster which by the way, was so huge, it had to be sliced in half for eating. After both plump pieces had slipped down my throat, most of the remaining whisky was poured into the empty half-shell for me to slowly savour. Such delicious fun!
You might be wondering why the name "Southpaw". Well, Roy explained he didn't want something obviously Japanese as they aren't a classic or traditional sushi restaurant since they offer whisky to pair (but he does stock sake for the traditionalists though). Instead, he wanted something unexpected with a positive slant. Thus the name, because in the sport of boxing, a left-handed boxer would take on a "southpaw" stance, which is believed to give strategic advantage.
It was a real pleasure chatting with both him and Leading Chef Kenny Khoo, an industry veteran with more than seventeen years of experience at Nogawa and Tatsuya, last night.

About Veronica Phua
Veronica Phua

Veronica Phua

5014 Reviews  89725 Followers

Can't cook to save my life but boy, can I eat! 😄 (I pay for all my meals unless otherwise stated)

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